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Sep
15

Glossary of Shooting & Industry Terms

Glossary of Shooting & Industry Terms

  • Clay pigeon shooting is the art of shooting at decoyed speeding targets, known as clays, with a shot gun.
  • Butt is where the shooter stands when shooting at the clay targets.
  • A “clay” is a circular disc made out of clay.
  • Trap is a machine which projects the clay disc.
  • Rabbit is a clay target that rolls and bounces across the land imitating a rabbit.
  • Standard
    • The most commonly used target of all, must weigh 105 g and be of 110 mm overall diameter and 25–26 mm in height for International competitions and for American competitions they must weigh approximately 100 g (3.5 oz) and be of 108 mm (4.3 in) overall diameter and 28.0–29.0 mm (1.10–1.14 in) in height.
  • Midi
    • Same saucer shape as the standard but with a diameter of only 90 mm; these targets are faster than the mini and standard types.
  • Mini
    • This target is sometimes likened to a flying bumblebee at only 60 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height.
  • Battue
    • A very thin target measuring about 108–110 mm in diameter, it flies very fast and falls off very suddenly simulating a duck landing. They are generally more expensive than other targets.
  • Rabbit
    • A thicker, but standard 108–110 mm diameter flat target in the shape of a wheel designed to run along the ground.
  • ZZ
    • This is a plastic, standard sized target attached to the centre of a two-blade propeller of different colour designed to zigzag in flight in a totally unpredictable manner.

These are names for different types of clay targets thrown and rules used at Twin Creek Shooting Club Shetland Ontario, Canada. You may only load your gun with 2 shots at any time for either a single or a pair.

  • Bird
    • Any type of target that flies: Includes Standard, Midi, Mini and Battue targets, when called generally means a single bird unless used in combination with other words or types of targets.
  • Rabbit
    • A rabbit, a target that rolls and usually bounces across the ground, it can sometimes go into the air and when it does it becomes known as a flying rabbit.
  • Flying rabbit
    • A rabbit target that flies into the air.
  • Squirrel
    • Slang for a rabbit that does not bounce but only rolls.
  • Turkey
    • Slang for a rabbit target that sometimes comes out in the air and sometimes rolls and/or bounces along the ground.
  • Single
    • One target is thrown, you may take two shots at it, when called alone refers to birds. If an odd amount of targets are thrown, the first target is generally a single (rarely is it thrown not as the first target because this confuses the shooters), new shooters will sometimes play games in which the trapper will only throw singles, rarely will more advanced shooter play with more singles than needed (only stations with odd amounts of targets thrown).
  • Single rabbit
    • A subset of Single, one rabbit is thrown; you may take 2 shots at it
  • Single bird
    • A subset of Single, one bird is thrown, although if all birds are used it is generally just called a single. You may take 2 shots at it.
  • Pair
    • Two targets are thrown; you may take 2 shots in combination. Also can be called double almost anywhere the word pair is used (may change grammar slightly), when called generally refers to bird targets.
  • True pair
    • A subset of Pair, two bird targets are thrown together, you may take 2 shots in combination, they are generally called a “Pair”, this ambiguous name makes it confusing when if you are unfamiliar with the way things are called.
  • Pair of rabbits
    • A subset of pair, this is called when two rabbits are thrown together, you may take 2 shots in combination
  • Bird-rabbit pair/rabbit-bird pair
    • When a bird and rabbit are released at the same time, rarely if ever used, very difficult targets (requires a quick shot and good eyes to find the next target)
  • Nested pair
    • a subset of pair, two targets are thrown, a mini is put under a regular and when released simulate a bird and a young, most people find that shooting the small one first and then the larger one is easiest if attempting to hit both, however new shooters often shoot at the big one first to have a higher probability of hitting at least one of the two targets
  • Following pair
    • A subset of pair, a target is released and then another target is released soon after (generally as fast as the machine or trapper can reload another single, however not always). When called generally refers to birds.
  • Rabbit following pair
    • A subset of following pair, a rabbit is thrown and another rabbit is thrown (generally as fast as the machine or trapper can reload another single, however not always).
  • Bird following pair
    • A subset of following pair, is when a following pair of birds are going to be thrown, almost only called that when rabbits are being thrown at that station.
  • Bird-rabbit following pair
    • a subset of following pair, a bird is thrown and then a rabbit with a timed delay as the targets are loaded in separate parts on 2 machines(with 2 trappers for manual machines, or 2 buttons for automatic machines) or on one combination machine(almost always manual by 1 trapper), rarely if ever thrown
  • Rabbit-bird following pair
    • A subset of following pair, same as bird-Rabbit following pair but rabbit is thrown first, rarely ever thrown, even rarer as bird-rabbit following pair and generally will confuse shooter.
  • Report pair
    • Is a subset of pair, a single target is thrown and as soon as the shooter shoots, another target is thrown, usually refers to bird targets.
  • Bird-rabbit
    • Subset of report pair, when a bird is thrown and then a rabbit is released after the gamer takes a shot.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://castellosportingclub.com/shooting-terms-glossary/2011/09/15/

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